Molten Salts in Nuclear Technology Laboratory

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PI: Dr Clint Sharrad
The MSNTL aims to provide a molten salt R&D capability for studying fluoride salts in nuclear systems within the UK for the first time:
  • Enabling the UK’s expertise in chloride salts from pyroprocessing research to alternative salt systems in order to explore expanding research areas such as Molten Salt Reactor technologies.
  • Providing an interdisciplinary hub for molten salts research with radioactive materials. 
Image of Dalton Cumbrian Facility

Dalton Cumbrian Facility

© University of Manchester. Image courtesy of Dalton Nuclear Institute

Np(IV) in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic

Np(IV) in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic

Image courtesy of Hugues Lambert and Clint Sharrad
– University of Manchester

Equipment to include

  • Numerous materials corrosion test rigs
  • Gravity-fed molten salts flow loop
  • Molten salts irradiation test rig
  • High temperature column for dynamic ion exchange studies with molten salts
  • Bespoke gloveboxes and supporting infrastructure for handling molten salts with radioactive material
  • Supporting furnaces of various types
  • TGA/DSC coupled with GC-MS
  • High temperature rheometers
  • Potentiostats
  • Various existing spectroscopic and electrochemical kit

Network of locations

Contact

Dr Clint Sharrad, The University of Manchester, clint.a.sharrad@manchester.ac.uk.

 

NNUF funded user access scheme for MSNTL

As a first step, please email clint.a.sharrad@manchester.ac.uk to contact MSNTL for a discussion about the practical feasibility of your proposed research project. Then, you will need to complete a simple NNUF application form. When doing so, please upload an email exchange between you and a member of staff at MSNTL, confirming the feasibility of your proposed research. Please see the access page of this website for more detail about the NNUF funded user access scheme.

© University of Manchester.